JUNIOR PHILATELISTS ON THE INTERNET


United States Postage Stamps
A History


Regular, Commementive, Memorial Issues
diamondIntroduction ~ Series of 1847
diamond Series of 1851
diamond Series of 1861
diamond Series of 1869
diamond Issues of 1870
diamond Issues of 1890&3
diamond Columbian Series of 1893
diamond Isues of 1894
diamond Trans-Mississippi Exposition Stamps of 1898
diamond Pan-American Stamps of 1901
diamond Series of 1902-3
diamond Lousiana Purchase Commemorative Stamps of 1904
diamond Jamestown Commemorative Stamps of 1907
diamond Issues of 1908-9
diamond Issues of 1909
diamond Issues of 1912
diamondPanama-Pacific Commemorative Stamps of 1913
diamond Issues of 1914-5
diamond Issues of 1918
diamond Issues of 1919
diamond Pilgram Tercentenary Commemorative Stamps of 1920
diamond Issues of 1922-23
diamond Issue of 1923
diamond Huguenot-Walloon Tercentenary Stamps of 1924
diamond Issues of 1925
diamond Issues of 1926
diamond Issues of 1927
diamond Issues of 1928
diamond Issues of 1929
diamond Issues of 1930
diamond Isues of 1931
diamond Washington Bicentennal Commemorative Stamps of 1932 & other Issues
diamond Issues of 1933
diamond Issues of 1934
diamond Issues of 1935
diamond Special Souvenior sheets of 1935
diamond Issues of 1936
diamond Issues of 1937
diamond Issues of 1938
diamond Issues of 1939
diamond Famous Americans Commem's of 1940 & Others
diamond Vnmont Statehood of 1941
diamond Issues of 1942
diamond Overrun Countries commem's of 1943-44 & Others
diamond Issues of 1944
diamond Roosevelt and Armed Forces Series of 1945 & Others
diamond Issues of 1946
diamond Issues of 1947

Air Mail Stamps
diamond Issues of 1918-1947
Carriers' Stamps
diamond Issues of 1851
Newspaper & Periodical Stamps
diamond Issues of 1865
diamond Issues of 1875
diamond Issues of 1895
Offical Postage Stamps
diamond Issues of 1873-1884
Parcel Post Stamps
diamond Issues of 1912-1913
Postage Due Stamps
diamond Issues of 1879-1930
Parcel Post Postage Due Stamps
diamond  Issues of 1912
Postal Savings Offical Stamps
diamond Issues of 1910-1911
Postal Savings Stamps
diamond Issue of 1911
Registry Stamp
diamond Issue of 1911
Special Delivery Air Mail Stamp
diamond Issue of 1934-1936
Special Delivery Stamps
diamond Issues of 1885-1925
Special Handling Stamp
diamond Issue of 1925

United States Postage Stamps

1847 through 1947 ~ The first 100 years

AIRMAIL STAMPS-ISSUE OF 1918

Airmail service was established May 15, 1918, between Washington, Philadelphia, and New York. Letters and sealed parcels, the latter not exceeding 30 inches in length and girth combined, could be mailed at Washington, Philadelphia, and New York for any city in the United States or its possessions.

The rate of postage was fixed at 24 cents per ounce or fraction thereof, which included special delivery service.

To meet this postage requirement, the Department issued a distinctive stamp in the 24-cent denomination, which was first placed on sale May 13, 1918, at Washington, D.C.

The stamp is rectangular in shape, about 7/8 inch long and 3/4 inch high. The central design is a mail airplane in flight. Above, in a curved line of Roman capital letters, are the words "U. S. Postage." Triangular ornaments appear in the two upper corners. Below the airplane, in a straight line of Roman capital letters, is the word "Cents", with the numerals "24" within circles in the two lower corners. The stamp is printed in two colors; the border design is red and the airplane is blue.

The rate of postage for airmail service was changed to 16 cents, effective July 15, 1918, and the Department issued a new airmail postage stamp of the 16-cent denomination, which was first placed on sale July 11, 1918, at Washington, D.C. The design is the same as the 24-cent stamp, except that the numerals "16" appear within the circles in the two lower corners and the color is green.

The rate of postage on airmail matter was reduced to 6 cents, effective December 15, 1918. This rate did not include special delivery service.

A new airmail stamp of the 6-cent denomination was issued to conform to the new rate, but no change was made in the design of this stamp from that of the 16-cent and 24-cent airmail stamps, except that the numeral "6" appears within the circle in the two lower corners and the color is orange. This stamp was first placed on sale at Washington, D.C., on December 10, 1918.


AIRMAIL STAMPS-ISSUE OF 1923

This series of airmail stamps was issued primarily for use in the new night flying air mail service between New York and San Francisco.

Three zones were established in connection with this service, the first from New York to Chicago, the second from Chicago to Cheyenne, and the third from Cheyenne to San Francisco. The rate of postage was 8 cents an ounce, or fraction there of, for each zone, or part of zone, in which mail was carried by plane.

The stamps are about 7/8 by 3/4 inch in dimension, arranged horizontally. The central design of the 8-cent stamp is a mail airplane radiator with propeller attached. Above this design in a curved panel are the words "U. S. postage" in white Roman capital letters. Triangular ornaments appear in both upper corners. Below the central design, in a straight line of Roman capital letters, is the word "Cents", with the numeral "8" within ovals in both lower corners. The 8-cent stamp is printed in green ink.

The 16-cent stamp is the same shape and size as the 8-cent stamp and has for its central design the official insignia of the airmailservice, showing a circular design with spread wings on either side. In the center, upon a dark background, appear the letters "U. S." with the word "Air" above and the word "Mail" below. Above this central design in a curved panel are the words "U. S. postage" in white Roman capital letters. A dark shaded triangle appears in both upper corners of the stamp. Below the central design in a straight line of Roman capital letters is the word "Cents" with the numeral "16" within circles, with dark backgrounds in both lower corners. The stamp is printed in blue ink.

The 24-cent stamp is the same shape and size as the other denominations and has for its central design a mail airplane in flight. Above this design in a curved panel are the words "U. S. postage" in white Roman capital letters. Ornamental scrolls appear in both upper corners. Below the central design in a straight line of Roman capital letters is the word "Cents", with the numeral "24" within circles with dark backgrounds in both lower corners. The stamp is printed in red ink.

The new airmail stamps were first placed on sale at the Philatelic Agency, Division of Stamps, Post Office Department, on the following dates: 8-cent, August 15, 1923; 16­cent, August 17, 1923; and 24-cent, August 21, 1923, but they were not issued to post masters until August 24, 1923, when they were sent to 16 designated post offices, which had been selected as mailing points on the airmail route.

Owing to the new airmail service not having been permanently established at that time, the postmasters at these offices were instructed to withhold the sale of these stamps to the public until advised by the Department. It was later decided that the new airmail service should become effective July 1, 1924, and the airmail stamps were accordingly placed on sale to the public beginning June 16,1924.


AIRMAIL STAMP (15-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1926

NEW DENOMINATION

A new airmail stamp of 15-cent denomination was issued for use in the contract air­mail service and first placed on sale at Washington, D.C., September 13, 1926. This stamp is the same shape, size, and design as the 10-cent air mail stamp, issued February 13, 1926, in accordance with act of Congress approved February 2, 1925, except that the numerals "15" appear in both lower corners of the stamp and it is printed in sepia.


AIRMAIL STAMP (20-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1927

NEW DENOMINATION

Owing to the new rate of postage on air mail effective February 1, 1927, the Department issued a new 20-cent airmail stamp, which was first placed on sale at New York, N.Y., and Washington, D.C., January 25,1927. This stamp is the same shape, size, and design as the 10-cent and 15-cent airmail stamps of 1926, except that the numerals "20" appear in both lower corners of the stamp and it is

printed in green.


LINDBERGH AIRMAIL STAMP (10-CENT)­ISSUE OF 1927

As a special tribute to Co!. Charles A. Lindbergh, the intrepid airmail pilot who made the first nonstop flight from New York to Paris, the Department issued a new 10-cent airmail stamp which temporarily displaced the current 10-cent airmail stamp, issue of 1926.

The new stamp is the same shape and size, 75/00 by 1 84/100 inches, as the airmail stamps of 1926-27 and is printed in blue. The central design represents Lindbergh's airplane, The Spirit of Saint Louis, in flight. Across the top of the stamp, in white Roman letters, are the words "United States postage", with the words "Lindbergh air mail" directly beneath. At the left of the central design appears the coastline of the North American Continent, with the words "New York" in small dark letters, and to the right appears the coastline of Europe, showing Ireland, Great Britain, and France, with the word "Paris", also in small dark letters. A dotted line depicting the course of the flight to France connects the two cities. At the bottom of the stamp, in shaded letters, is the word "Cents" and in both lower corners are the white numerals "10." The stamp is enclosed within a straight line border.

The 10-cent Lindbergh airmail stamp was first placed on sale June 18, 1927, at the post offices at St. Louis, Mo., Detroit, Mich., Little Falls, Minn., and Washington, D.C. This stamp was also issued in books of 6 stamps, 'which were first placed on sale at Washington, D.C., and Cleveland, Ohio, on May 26, 1928.


AIRMAIL STAMP (5-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1928

The 5-cent airmail stamp was issued to meet the new rate of postage on airmail matter, effective August 1, 1928.

The stamp is a horizontal rectangle 1 3/32 by 1 15/32 inches in size and is printed in two colors, the outer border is red and the vignette in blue. The central design represents the beacon light on Sherman Hill, in the Rocky Mountains, with a mail plane in flight at the left. In a panel at the top of the stamp are the words "U.S. postage" in white Roman letters, and on ribbons directly beneath, supported by acanthus scrolls, are the words "Air" on the left and "Mail" on the right. Ornamental designs appear in both upper corners, and in both lower corners; within circles with dark backgrounds is the white numeral "5" A white border panel at the bottom of the stamp contains the word "Cents" in white Roman letters.

The 5-cent airmail stamp was first placed on sale July 25, 1928, at Washington, D.C.


AIRMAIL STAMP (5-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1930

This 5-cent airmail stamp displaced the bicolored airmail stamp.

The stamp is the same shape and size, 75/100 by 1 84/100 inches, as the 10-, 15-, and 20-cent airmail stamps of 1926-27, and is printed in purple. The central design is a reproduction of the insignia of an airmail pilot, a globe with extended wings on either side, with a background of rays of light. Upon the globe are the words "U. S. air mail" In a horizontal panel across the top of the stamp are the words "United States postage" in white Roman letters and at the bottom in an ornate panel is the word "Cents." The white numeral "5" appears within circles in both lower corners.

This airmail stamp was first placed on sale February 10, 1930, at Washington, D.C.


"GRAF ZEPPELIN" AIR MAIL STAMPS - ISSUES OF 1930

   

   

This special series of airmail stamps was issued for use on mail matter carried on the first Europe-Pan American round trip flight of the Graf Zeppelin in May 1930. This series contains three stamps in denominations of 65 cents, $1.30, and $2.60.

The stamps are the same shape and size as the airmail stamps of 1926-27, 75/100 by 1 84/100 inches, and are described as follows:

The border design is the same for each stamp, with the necessary change of numerals representing the value. At the top of the stamp in a straight line are the words "Graf Zeppelin" with the words "Europe-Pan America flight" directly beneath. At the bottom of the stamp in a dark panel appear the words "United States postage" and within circles in both lower corners are the numerals showing the denomination.

The 65-cent stamp is printed in green and contains as the central design a representation of the Graf Zeppelin in flight across the Atlantic Ocean in an eastward direction.

In the $1.30 stamp the airship is shown sailing westward between partial outlines of the eastern and western continents. This stamp is printed in brown.

The design of the $2.60 stamp shows the eraf Zeppelin emerging from the clouds, pass­ing a globe representing the earth, and traveling toward the West. This stamp is printed in blue.

The Graf Zeppelin stamps were first placed on sale at the post office, Washington, D.C., and the Philatelic Agency on April 19, 1930. The stamps were placed on sale at the following additional post offices on April 21, 1930:

Alabama-Birmingham.

Arizona-Phoenix.

Arkansas-Little Rock.

California-Los Angeles, Oakland, and San Francisco.

Colorado-Denver.

Connecticut-Bridgeport, Hartford, and New Haven.

Delaware-Wilmington.

Florida-Jacksonville, Miami, and Tampa.

Georgia-Atlanta and Savannah.

Idaho-Boise.

Illinois-Chicago, Peoria, and Springfield.

Indiana-Fort Wayne, Indianapolis, and South Bend.

Iowa-Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, and Sioux City.

Kansas-Topeka and Wichita.

Kentucky-Louisville.

Louisiana-New Orleans.

Maine-Portland.

Maryland-Baltimore.

Massachusetts-Boston, Springfield, and Worcester.

Michigan-Detroit, Grand Rapids, and  Lansing.

Minnesota-Duluth, Minneapolis, and St.Paul.

Mississippi-Vicksburg.

Missouri-Kansas City, St. Joseph, and St.Louis.

Montana-Helena.

Nebraska-Lincoln and Omaha.

Nevada-Reno.

New Hampshire-Concord.

New Jersey-Jersey City, Newark, and Trenton.

New Mexico-Albuquerque.

New York-Albany, Brooklyn, Buffalo, New York, Rochester, Schenectady, and Syracuse.

North Carolina-Charlotte and Greensboro.

North Dakota-Fargo.

Ohio-Akron, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Springfield, and Toledo.

Oklahoma-Oklahoma City and Tulsa.

Oregon-Portland.

Pennsylvania-Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Scranton.

Rhode Island-Providence.

South Carolina-Charleston.

South Dakota-Sioux Falls.

Tennessee-Chattanooga, Memphis, and Nashville.

Texas-Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio.

Utah-Salt Lake City. Vermont-Burlington.

Virginia-Norfolk and Richmond.

Washington-Seattle and Spokane.

West Virginia-Charleston and Wheeling.

Wisconsin-Madison and Milwaukee.

Wyoming-Cheyenne.

The Zeppelin stamps were withdrawn from sale in the above post offices on June 7, 1930, but the stamps were continued on sale in the Philatelic Agency for the benefit of stamp collectors until June 30, 1930.


AIRMAIL STAMP (8-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1932

The issuance of an airmail stamp in this denomination was required to conform to the new airmail rate which became effective July 6, 1932.

The 8-cent airmail stamp is of the same size, shape, and design as the 5-cent airmail stamp of the 1930 issue, containing a reproduction of the insignia of the airmail service as the central design. No modification was made except to substitute the denomination numeral "8" in the circular panel in each lower corner and to change the color to olive green.

The 8-cent airmail stamp was first placed on sale in Washington, D.C., on September 26, 1932.


SPECIAL "GRAF ZEPPELIN" AIRMAIL STAMP (50-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1933

This special stamp was provided for use on airmail matter carried on the flight of the Graf Zeppelin to the Century of Progress Exposition, in October 1933.

The stamp is the same shape and size as the airmail stamps of the 1926-27 series, 75/100 by 1 84/100 inches, printed in green. The central design is a representation of the Graf Zeppelin over the Atlantic Ocean. To the right appears the hangar at Friedrichshafen, and to the left is shown the Federal Building at the Century of Progress Exposition. Across the top of the stamp appear the words "United States postage", in solid Roman letters, and immediately underneath are the words "A Century of Progress Flight" in smaller Gothic type. In a large oval with dark background below the central design is the denomination designation "50c" in white lettering. The stamp is enclosed in a border formed by two narrow parallel lines.

The special Zeppelin stamp was placed on sale at the following post offices until after the completion of the flight: Miami, Fla., Chicago, m., New York, N.Y., and Akron, Ohio. The stamp was first placed on sale at New York, N.Y., on October 2, 1933. The stamp was placed on sale in the Phila­telic Agency, Post Office Department, Octo­ber 5, 1933.


AIRMAIL STAMP (6-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1934

The issuance of this denomination air­mail stamp was required to conform to the adjusted airmail rates which became effective on July 1, 1934.

The 6-cent airmail postage stamp is identi­cal in size and design with the 5-cent airmail stamp of the 1930 issue and the 8-cent air­mail stamp of 1932; the only alterations are a change in the denomination num­eral to "6" and the color to orange. The Department did not authorize a first-day sale for this stamp, but it was available at many post offices on July 1, 1934.


TRANS-PACIFIC AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1935

This special stamp in the denomination of 25 cents was issued primarily for use on mail matter dispatched by Trans-Pacific airmail service to Hawaii, Guam, and Philippine Islands. The new stamp is also valid for use on regular airmail.

The stamp is of the same size as the special delivery stamp, 84/100 by 1 44/100 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally. It is surrounded by a double-line border and is printed in blue ink. In a narrow panel with white edges and dark ground across the top of the stamp is the wording, "Trans-Pacific Air Mail", in white Roman, with the date "November 1935" directly underneath in dark Gothic. In a horizontal panel with white edges and dark ground at the centcr of the lower margin of the stamp is the inscription reading "U. S. postage", in white Roman. In circular panels with white edges and dark ground in each lower corner of the stamp is the denomination designation "25c' in white. Included in the central design is a representation of the sun rising from the shores of America, with a seaplane in flight over the ocean. At the right is pictured a modern ocean liner and at the left a Chinese junk, both partly obscured by the panels contain­ing the denomination numeral. In the distance is a three masted sailing vessel and a steamship representative of the middle nineteenth century period. The shield of the United States is shown at the upper left and that of the Philippine Islands at the upper right.

The new airmail stamp was first placed on sale November 22, 1935, at the post offices in San Francisco, Calif., and Washington, D.C.

Collectors desiring covers between the designated points on the first Trans-Pacific flight to and from Manila were permitted to send any desired number of envelopes bearing their home address under separate cover endorsed: "By First Contract Trans-Pacific Flight", to the postmasters at the respective offices, with remittance payable to the post master to cover the cost of the stamps required to be affixed thereto on a basis of the following rates:

Each self-addressed envelope sent to these postmasters for dispatch by the first contract flight was required to bear an endorsement showing the scope of the service desired; for example, "San Francisco to Hawaii", "San Francisco to Philippine Islands", "Guam to San Francisco", etc. Upon arrival at the indicated destination such covers were continued in the mails to the addressee.The Postmasters, San Francisco, Calif., and Washington, D.C., were authorized to comply with requests from collectors for first day covers of the new airmail stamp on November 22, to be sent by regular airmail direct to the addressee.


NEW ISSUE SPECIAL DELIVERY AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1936

This new issue of 16-cent special delivery airmail stamps was provided in bicolor to replace the stamp previously in use printed in blue ink.

The new stamp is 84/100 by 1 44/100 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally, and is identical in design with the 16-cent special delivery airmail stamp issued on August 30, 1934, except for the reduction in size of the central subject and the printing of the stamp in two colors, the border in red and the cen­tral design, which is a reproduction of the Great Seal of the United States, in blue. This change in style was made in order that the stamp would be more distinctive and easily recognized, thereby contributing to the prompt and proper handling of such mail matter.

The bicolor 16-cent special delivery air­mail stamp was first placed on sale at Wash­ington, D.c., on February 10, 1936.


TRANS-PACIFIC AIRMAIL STAMPS-ISSUE OF 1937

   

The new denomination stamps were issued to conform to the revised rates effective at the time of the extension of the Trans-Pacific air mail service to China.

The stamps conform in design to the original issue of 1935 except for the change of denomination and the elimination of the date "November 1935." The 20-cent stamp is printed in green and the 50-cent in carmine. They were first placed on sale in the Philatelic Agency, Washington, D.C., on February 15, 1937.


AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1938

This stamp was provided to facilitate the recognition of air mail matter through the adoption of a more distinctive design.

This 6-cent airmail stamp is of the special delivery size, 84/100 by 1 44/100 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally. The stamp was printed in bicolor, the border in blue and the central design in red, the latter depicting an eagle with outstretched wings, bearing in its talons a shield, olive wreath, and bundle of arrows. At the top of the stamp is a panel of conventionalized wing design, divided in the center by a small United States shield, with the words "Air" at the left and "Mail" at the right in heavy dark letters of the Gothic type. In rectangular­shaped panels in each lower corner is the denomination designation "6rj:" in white. An ornamental border extends from the top of these panels across the ends of the stamp. In a narrow panel with dark ground at the lower edge of the stamp is the inscription "U. S. Postage" in white Gothic-type letters.

The new airmail stamp was first placed on sale on May 14, 1938, at Dayton, Ohio, the home of the Wright brothers, builders of the first successful airplane, and St. Petersburg, Fla., where the first passenger flight was made. At the latter place the stamp was sold at the temporary postal station of the St. Petersburg office, established at the head­quarters of the annual convention of the American Air Mail Society.


TRANS-ATLANTIC AIRMAIL POSTAGE STAMP-ISSUE OF 1939

This stamp was issued in contemplation of the establishment of transatlantic airmail service.

The dimensions of this stamp are 75/100 by 1 84/100 inches, arranged horizontally. It was printed in blue, on fiat plates and issued in sheets of 50.

In design, the stamp is very similar to the 5-cent airmail of 1930, the 8-cent of 1932, and the 6-cent issue of 1934, in which the insignia of an airmail pilot was employed for the central subject. Directly above the globe has been added the inscription: "Trans­Atlantic", in dark Gothic. Between the denomination numerals and the word "Cents" appear ocean liners, replacing the ornamentations previously used.

The 30-cent airmail stamp was first sold at New York, N.Y., on May 16, 1939.


AIR-MAIL SERIES-ISSUE OF 1941

These stamps were furnished to provide a uniform series to replace similar denominations which had been issued at various in­tervals since 1926.

Each stamp is of the special delivery size, 84/100 by 1 44/100 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally, and issued in sheets of 50 by the rotary process.

The central design is a reproduction of a modern type transport plane in flight, which occupies the major portion of the space except that needed for the inscriptions. Below the plane is the denomination numeral with the word "Cents" directly beneath in dark Gothic lettering. To the left of the denomination numeral is the word "Air" and to the right the word "Mail" in lettering of like type. At the lower edge of the stamp in a narrow panel with solid background is the inscription "United States of America" in white Gothic lettering.


AIRMAIL STAMP (8-CENT)-ISSUE OF 1944

The issuance of this denomination airmail stamp was required to conform to the adjusted airmail rate which became effective March 26, 1944.

The 8-cent airmail stamp is identical in size and design with the 6-cent airmail stamp of the 1941 issue, the only alterations being that of a change in the denomination numeral to "8" and the color to olive-green.

The stamp was first placed on sale at Washington, D.c., on March 21, 1944.


AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1946

This stamp was provided to meet the decrease in the airmail postage rate.

The stamp is of the special delivery size, 0.84 by 1.44 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally, printed by the rotary process in red, and issued in sheets of 50 subjects. The central design is a modern type four-motored transport plane in flight. Above the plane is the wording, "Air Mail," in dark face Gothic and on either side of the plane appears the numeral "5c" in the same style lettering. At the bottom of the stamp in a narrow panel with a dark background is the lettering, "United States of America," in white face Gothic.

The stamp was first offered for sale at the Washington, D.C., post office on September 25, 1946.


AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1947

This new stamp was issued because the small size is more suitable for coils, stamp vending machines and books of stamps. It is the same size as the ordinary issue, 0.75 by 0.87 inch in dimension, arranged horizontally, printed by the rotary process, in red, and issued in sheets of 100 subjects. The central design depicts a DC-4 plane in flight. Above the plane is the wording "Air Mail" and the denomination "5c" in two lines of dark Gothic. Just below the plane appears the wording "U.S. Postage" in the same style of lettering.

The stamp was placed on sale at the Washington, D.C., post office on March 26, 1947.


AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1947

The issuance of an airmail stamp in this denomination was required to conform to the international airmail rate of twenty.five cents a half ounce, effective November 1, 1946, on mail destined to Pacific and Asiatic areas and to portions of Africa.

The stamp is 0.84 by 1.44 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally, printed by the rotary process in blue, and issued in panes of 50. The central design depicts a modern four-motor plane in flight above the San Francisco.Oakland Bay Bridge with the city of San Francisco in the background. The wording "Air Mail" in dark Gothic appears in the upper left of the stamp and across the bottom in a dark panel is the lettering "United States Postage." At the extreme right above the panel is the denomination "25c" on a dark circular background.

This stamp was first placed on sale at San Francisco, Calif., on July 30,1947.


AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1947

This special stamp in the 15-cent denomination was issued primarily for use on mail matter destined to Europe and points in North Africa.

The stamp is 0.84 by 1.44 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally, printed by the rotary process in green, and issued in 50-subject panes. The central design is a reproduction of the Statue of Liberty showing the New York City skyline in the background and a modern four motor plane in flight. In the upper right portion of the stamp is the wording "Air Mail" in dark Gothic. Across the bottom in a dark panel is the inscription "United States Postage" in white Gothic, directly above and to the right of which is the denomination "15c" in the same style on a circular background.

This stamp was first placed on sale at New York, N.Y., on August 20,1947.


AIRMAIL STAMP-ISSUE OF 1947

This special stamp in the 10-cent denomination was issued primarily for use on mail matter destined to South and Central American countries.

The stamp is 0.84 by 1.44 inches in dimension, arranged horizontally, printed by the rotary process in black, and issued in panes of 50. The central subject is a reproduction of the Pan American Union Building in Washington, D.C. In the upper right portion of the stamp is a modern twin motor plane in flight, to the left of which is the wording "Air Mail" in dark Gothic. Across the lower border of the stamp, ar­ranged in one line, is the denomination "10c" and wording "United States Postage," respectively, in white modified Roman.

This stamp was first placed on sale at Washington, D.C., on August 30, 1947.



Carriers' Stamps
diamond Issues of 1851
Newspaper & Periodical Stamps
diamond Issues of 1865
diamond Issues of 1875
diamond Issues of 1895
Offical Postage Stamps
diamond Issues of 1873-1884
Parcel Post Stamps
diamond Issues of 1912-1913
Postage Due Stamps
diamond Issues of 1879-1930
Parcel Post Postage Due Stamps
diamond  Issues of 1912
Postal Savings Offical Stamps
diamond Issues of 1910-1911
Postal Savings Stamps
diamond Issue of 1911
Registry Stamp
diamond Issue of 1911
Special Delivery Air Mail Stamp
diamond Issue of 1934-1936
Special Delivery Stamps
diamond Issues of 1885-1925
Special Handling Stamp
diamond Issue of 1925

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